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Posts tagged history

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History Crush Wednesday

Maureen Dunlop de Popp

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Maureen Dunlop de Popp was an Argentine born British pilot who flew for the Air Transport Auxiliary during World War II. She was one of many female pilots who flew planes between factories and military airfields across the country. In order to join the ATA, de Popp and the other female pilots needed to log 500 hours of solo flying (whereas men only needed 250) often times with little training. She was trained to fly 38 different types of aircraft including Spitfires, Mustangs, and the de Havilland Mosquito. Although she wasn’t allowed to fly combat missions, her flights weren’t always safe due to weather conditions.

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After the war de Popp worked as a flying instructor and commercial pilot in Argentina. In 2003, she was one of three female ATA pilots awarded the Guild of Air Pilots and Air Navigator’s Master Air Pilot Award. She died in 2012 in Norfolk.

Filed under history maureen dunlop de popp world war II history crush

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infinitedomain:

Elspeth Beard

The first Englishwoman to circumnavigate the world by motorcycle.

Three decades ago, 24 year old architecture student, Elspeth Beard, set out to ride her bike around the world– a trek that would take 3 years and over 48K miles. The young Englishwoman, who’d been riding since she was just 16 yrs old, had already taken a few solo journeys to Scotland and Ireland– and now was ready to take on more before she finished school and settled down into a career.

Beard’s bike was a used 1974 BMW R 60/6 flat-twin.

[Read more]

Filed under history elspeth beard history crush

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todaysdocument:

"Damn the Torpedoes!"

Admiral David G. Farragut, ca. 1860 - ca. 1865
From the series: Mathew Brady Photographs of Civil War-Era Personalities and Scenes

A combined assault by a Federal fleet commanded by Rear Admiral David Farragut and Union infantry forces defeated a Confederate fleet and the 3 forts defending Mobile Bay, Alabama on August 5, 1864 (the forts would fall several days later following a short siege).  The loss would deprive the Confederacy of one of its last major ports.  (Farragut had captured New Orleans two years before.)
During the battle Farragut is widely reported to have ordered his ships forward despite the threat of submerged mines (then called torpedoes), calling out “Damn the Torpedoes, Go Ahead!" or more likely: "Damn the Torpedoes, Four Bells…”

todaysdocument:

"Damn the Torpedoes!"

Admiral David G. Farragut, ca. 1860 - ca. 1865

From the series: Mathew Brady Photographs of Civil War-Era Personalities and Scenes

A combined assault by a Federal fleet commanded by Rear Admiral David Farragut and Union infantry forces defeated a Confederate fleet and the 3 forts defending Mobile Bay, Alabama on August 5, 1864 (the forts would fall several days later following a short siege).  The loss would deprive the Confederacy of one of its last major ports.  (Farragut had captured New Orleans two years before.)

During the battle Farragut is widely reported to have ordered his ships forward despite the threat of submerged mines (then called torpedoes), calling out “Damn the Torpedoes, Go Ahead!" or more likely: "Damn the Torpedoes, Four Bells…

Filed under history civil war

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uispeccoll:

Not too many of our books are held together with iron bars and nails, but this hefty hymnal needs the support for its massive wooden boards.

Privately printed in 1646, for the Monastery of Santa Maria della Pace by Giovanni Agostino Casoni della Spezia in Genoa, no expense was spared for this weighty wonder, including commissioning a giant unique typeface and initials that were used exclusively for this work.  (Do you see how big that “I” is?  It is as big as my hand!).  In addition, each of the 103 pages is a full sheet printed as a broadside.

This is our most recent acquisition, and the bookseller Bruce McKittrick and his team did an incredible amount of research to figure out all the details about this unique hymnal.  As we sort through the included research and catalog this item, we will post an update.

Filed under history books

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bobbycaputo:

Inventories of war: soldiers’ kit from 1066 to 2014

Over the course of almost two centuries, the gear in a soldier’s kit has changed quite significantly. The photographer Thom Atkinson documented thirteen of these kits, ranging from a huscarl at the Battle of Hastings in 1066 to a close-support sapper in the Royal Engineers from 2014, in a Hypebeast Essentials style. The series, published on Telegraph UK, is called Soldiers Inventories, and it’s serious history porn.

(Continue Reading)

Filed under history

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distillerette:

Apollo 11 LM Interior (by NASA on The Commons)
 This interior view of the Apollo 11 Lunar Module shows Astronaut Edwin E. Aldrin, Jr., lunar module pilot, during the lunar landing mission. This picture was taken by Astronaut Neil A. Armstrong, commander, prior to the moon landing.

distillerette:

Apollo 11 LM Interior (by NASA on The Commons)


This interior view of the Apollo 11 Lunar Module shows Astronaut Edwin E. Aldrin, Jr., lunar module pilot, during the lunar landing mission. This picture was taken by Astronaut Neil A. Armstrong, commander, prior to the moon landing.

Filed under history nasa

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peerintothepast:

Some of the first American soldiers to attack the German defenses in Higgins Boats (LCVPs) approach Omaha Beach near Normandy, France on June 6, 1944. Plastic covers protect the soldier’s weapons against from the water. (Photo by Robert F. Sargent, U.S. Coast Guard/Galerie Bilderwelt/Getty Images)

peerintothepast:

Some of the first American soldiers to attack the German defenses in Higgins Boats (LCVPs) approach Omaha Beach near Normandy, France on June 6, 1944. Plastic covers protect the soldier’s weapons against from the water. (Photo by Robert F. Sargent, U.S. Coast Guard/Galerie Bilderwelt/Getty Images)

Filed under history d day world war II