Love Your Library

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Posts tagged history

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After I graduate next year I think I’m going to take an east coast, historical road trip. I want to go to some of the lesser known historical places. I live in Orlando so I’ll just work my way up and back down. Some spots I plan on going to:

  • St. Augustine, FL - The oldest city in the US. I’ve lived in FL for 16 years now and I’ve never been there.
  • Savannah, GA - My hometown. It has Ft. Jackson, the oldest standing brick fort in GA, and Tybee Island Light Station, the first lighthouse on the southern Atlantic coast.
  • Charleston, SC - Home of the museum ships USS Yorktown and USS Laffey, both built during World War II.
  • Kill Devil Hills, NC - Home of the Wright Brothers National Memorial where they took their first flight.
  • Ocracoke, NC - Where Blackbeard was killed. There’s a cove called Teach’s Hole where he was supposedly executed. It’s supposed to be haunted.
  • Richmond, VA - They have the Edgar Allen Poe Museum and the James Monroe tomb.
  • Mason Neck, VA - Home of founding father George Mason.
  • Alexandria, VA - Site of Gadsby’s Tavern. They serve period and modern foods. It was frequently visited by George Washington, John Adams, Thomas Jefferson, James Madison, and James Monroe.
  • Washington, DC - I’ve been here twice already. The Smithsonian Museums alone are enough to make me want to live there. Alas, I would need to be making a lot more money to afford it.
  • Silver Springs, MD - Home of the National Museum of Health and Medicine.
  • Baltimore, MD - It has the Flag House and Star Spangled Banner Museum, home of Mary Pickersgill who made the Star Spangled Banner flag. There’s also the museum ship USS Constellation, the last sail-only warship designed and built by the US Navy.
  • Altoona, PA - Home of the Leap-The-Dips roller coaster, the world’s oldest operating wooden roller coaster.
  • Pottsville, PA - Home of the D.G. Yuengling & Son Brewery, the oldest operating brewing company in the US and one of my favorite beers.

Any good places that I should add?

Filed under history road trip

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History Crush Wednesday

Poly Styrene

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Born Marianne Joan Elliot-Said, Poly Styrene was a British singer/songwriter for the punk rock band X-Ray Spex. She was one of the first female punk icons. Styrene moved to London on her own at 15, studying to be an opera singer. After seeing the Sex Pistols she decided to strike out into rock, placing an ad in a British magazine looking for “young punx who want to stick it together”. This led to the formation of X-Ray Spex. The group released one album, but became very popular in Britain performing in Chelsea and at the Roxy. They also toured in the US. Being of mixed race, having braces, and wearing bright colors, Styrene wasn’t the typical front person for a rock band in the 70’s.

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After X-Ray Spex broke up, Styrene went on to release three solo albums and remained active in the music scene. She died in 2011 from cancer. Kim Gordon of Sonic Youth and Kathleen Hanna of Bikini Kill and Le Trigre are said to have been inspired by her.

Filed under history poly styrene x-ray spex history crush

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erikkwakkel:

Medieval rockstar

The last page of a medieval book is usually a protective flyleaf, which is positioned between the actual text and the bookbinding. It was usually left blank and it therefore often filled up with pen trials, notes, doodles, or drawings. This addition I encountered today and it is not what you’d expect: a full-on drawing of a maiden playing the lute, which she holds just like a guitar. A peaceful smile shines on her face. I love this rockstar lady, so unexpectedly positioned at the end of the book, trying to catch the reader’s attention as he is closing it.

Pic: London, British Library, Sloane MS 554 (more here).

Filed under books history anyway here's wonderwall

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History Crush Wednesday

Rosalind Franklin

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Rosalind Franklin was an English biophysicist and x-ray crystallographer. Her work on the X-ray diffraction images of DNA led to the discovery of the DNA double helix. Along with DNA Franklin was instrumental in the understanding of the molecular structures of RNA, viruses, coal, and graphite.

Franklin received a Ph.D from Cambridge University in 1945. In 1951 she began working as a research associate at King’s College London in the biophysics unit. It was here that she was able to photograph DNA showing its double helix structure. Without her knowledge, and because bitches be trippin’, her research in DNA was shown to James Watson and Francis Crick who were also working on understanding DNA. Using her photographs allowed them to deduce the structure of DNA. Franklin, along with Watson and Crick, published their findings in the journal Nature in 1953.

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Franklin died of ovarian cancer in 1958 not knowing that her data was a key part of Watson and Crick’s research. These two, along with Maurice Wilkins, won the 1962 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine, but didn’t mention Franklin’s contributions. Through the publications of historians and others, including friend Anne Sayre, Franklin would begin to receive recognition for her work.

Filed under history rosalind franklin history crush

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History Crush Wednesday

Maureen Dunlop de Popp

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Maureen Dunlop de Popp was an Argentine born British pilot who flew for the Air Transport Auxiliary during World War II. She was one of many female pilots who flew planes between factories and military airfields across the country. In order to join the ATA, de Popp and the other female pilots needed to log 500 hours of solo flying (whereas men only needed 250) often times with little training. She was trained to fly 38 different types of aircraft including Spitfires, Mustangs, and the de Havilland Mosquito. Although she wasn’t allowed to fly combat missions, her flights weren’t always safe due to weather conditions.

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After the war de Popp worked as a flying instructor and commercial pilot in Argentina. In 2003, she was one of three female ATA pilots awarded the Guild of Air Pilots and Air Navigator’s Master Air Pilot Award. She died in 2012 in Norfolk.

Filed under history maureen dunlop de popp world war II history crush

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infinitedomain:

Elspeth Beard

The first Englishwoman to circumnavigate the world by motorcycle.

Three decades ago, 24 year old architecture student, Elspeth Beard, set out to ride her bike around the world– a trek that would take 3 years and over 48K miles. The young Englishwoman, who’d been riding since she was just 16 yrs old, had already taken a few solo journeys to Scotland and Ireland– and now was ready to take on more before she finished school and settled down into a career.

Beard’s bike was a used 1974 BMW R 60/6 flat-twin.

[Read more]

Filed under history elspeth beard history crush

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todaysdocument:

"Damn the Torpedoes!"

Admiral David G. Farragut, ca. 1860 - ca. 1865
From the series: Mathew Brady Photographs of Civil War-Era Personalities and Scenes

A combined assault by a Federal fleet commanded by Rear Admiral David Farragut and Union infantry forces defeated a Confederate fleet and the 3 forts defending Mobile Bay, Alabama on August 5, 1864 (the forts would fall several days later following a short siege).  The loss would deprive the Confederacy of one of its last major ports.  (Farragut had captured New Orleans two years before.)
During the battle Farragut is widely reported to have ordered his ships forward despite the threat of submerged mines (then called torpedoes), calling out “Damn the Torpedoes, Go Ahead!" or more likely: "Damn the Torpedoes, Four Bells…”

todaysdocument:

"Damn the Torpedoes!"

Admiral David G. Farragut, ca. 1860 - ca. 1865

From the series: Mathew Brady Photographs of Civil War-Era Personalities and Scenes

A combined assault by a Federal fleet commanded by Rear Admiral David Farragut and Union infantry forces defeated a Confederate fleet and the 3 forts defending Mobile Bay, Alabama on August 5, 1864 (the forts would fall several days later following a short siege).  The loss would deprive the Confederacy of one of its last major ports.  (Farragut had captured New Orleans two years before.)

During the battle Farragut is widely reported to have ordered his ships forward despite the threat of submerged mines (then called torpedoes), calling out “Damn the Torpedoes, Go Ahead!" or more likely: "Damn the Torpedoes, Four Bells…

Filed under history civil war

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uispeccoll:

Not too many of our books are held together with iron bars and nails, but this hefty hymnal needs the support for its massive wooden boards.

Privately printed in 1646, for the Monastery of Santa Maria della Pace by Giovanni Agostino Casoni della Spezia in Genoa, no expense was spared for this weighty wonder, including commissioning a giant unique typeface and initials that were used exclusively for this work.  (Do you see how big that “I” is?  It is as big as my hand!).  In addition, each of the 103 pages is a full sheet printed as a broadside.

This is our most recent acquisition, and the bookseller Bruce McKittrick and his team did an incredible amount of research to figure out all the details about this unique hymnal.  As we sort through the included research and catalog this item, we will post an update.

Filed under history books